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How you can protect yourself

SECURITY CENTER

 

What you can do to protect yourself

Let's work together to help keep your accounts safe from fraud and scams.

Six steps to help boost your account security

 

These steps can help you keep your Chase accounts and info safer from fraud and scams.

 

Get extra security at sign-in

 

2-step verification requires you to enter a unique code every time you sign in to Chase.com on a browser. This helps ensure that it's actually you and not someone suspicious.

 

 

Set up account alerts

 

Customize the alerts you want to see. Get notified when there's a purchase or withdrawal from your account that's over a certain amount.

 

Keep your contact info up to date

 

We need to be able to reach you quickly if we notice something amiss in your accounts. Review the contact information we have on file for you to make sure it's correct.

 

Set up ongoing identity monitoring

 

Get alerted when there are changes to your credit report or if your information is found in a data breach or exposed on the dark web with Credit Journey®. Plus check your score for free anytime. 

 

Protect your personal information

 

Reduce the risk of fraudsters stealing information from your paper statements. By going paperless, you can securely access them virtually anytime, anywhere in the Chase Mobile® app or online.

 

 

Use the latest browser

 

Keeping web browsers and operating systems updated helps protect your devices against vulnerabilities that hackers could exploit.

Watch out for unusual activity

 

Use the Chase Mobile® app to easily monitor your transactions and report anything suspicious.

Scan the code to start using Chase banking tools on the go.

 

Keep track of where your account is
stored online and monitor who has
access to it

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Track device log-ins to your account

Look out for suspicious activity by tracking which devices accessed your account and when.

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Track device log-ins to your account

Look out for suspicious activity by tracking which devices accessed your account and when.

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See where your card is stored

Check which online merchants have your card information stored to make sure it's in the right hands.

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See where your card is stored

Check which online merchants have your card information stored to make sure it's in the right hands.

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Manage access to your account information

Keep track of which apps and companies you're sharing your account information with. Then look at which accounts you want to share.

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Manage access to your account information

Keep track of which apps and companies you're sharing your account information with. Then look at which accounts you want to share.

Be careful using
checks

Scammers steal checks from the mail, change the names and amounts and deposit them into their own bank accounts through a process called "check washing." You can reduce your risk by sending fewer paper checks and enrolling in Chase OnlineBill Pay.

 

Learn to spot a scam

Knowing the techniques scammers use can help you stay one step ahead of them. Here are some things they do that you should be aware of.

 

 

They may pretend to be someone you know

 

Scammers often pretend to be contacting you from the IRS or Social Security Administration, or from a company you're familiar with, like your bank. They might make up a name that sounds official, or say they're calling on behalf of a loved one.

 


They may pressure you to act immediately

 

Scammers want you to act before you have time to think. They may say a family member has an emergency or your computer has a virus. Sometimes they threaten legal action, arrest or to freeze your bank account. They also may ask you not to tell anyone about it.

 


They may present you with a conditional prize or problem

 

Scammers may say you've won a prize that's too good to be true, and you have to pay a fee in order to receive it. They might say you're in trouble with the government, or a family member is in trouble and needs money.

 


They may ask you to pay in a specific manner

 

Scammers will often insist you pay by sending money through a payment app, wire transfer or by putting money on a gift card and then reading them the number on the back. Some will send you a fake check, ask you to deposit it and then ask you to send them the money.

 


Help us keep your money
safe from scammers

Download this handy guide to help protect your money from scammers

Download (PDF)

Guard your personal information

Don't offer information for someone who calls you directly, even if they say they're from Chase. When in doubt, you can always call us at the number on the back of your credit or debit card.

 

Take a moment before acting

Scammers may pressure you to act immediately, before you have a chance to think. Always take a break and think critically about who they are and what they're asking for.

 

Use caution when sending money

If someone asks you to pay in a specific way, like gift cards, money transfers or Zelle® it could be a red flag that you're being targeted for a scam. Be sure to verify who the recipient is before sending money through any means.

 

Not all payment methods offer the same protection

Credit and debit cards come with features that may not be there if you pay by other means. We'll work on your behalf to resolve an issue with a purchase with the merchant, like an item arriving damaged or not arriving at all. 

Received a
suspicious email?

When in doubt, don't engage: Rather than responding to an unexpected and seemingly fishy incoming communication, cut off possible scammers right away. Do not open links — instead, hit the "delete" key.

 

Received an email that you believe may be a scam? Forward it to phishing@chase.com.

 

You can also report suspicious calls, emails, and text messages to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.

Let's work together to help protect you and those you love

Help protect your money as you age

 

Recognize the signs of financial abuse and exploitation. Get the tools you need to help you stay safe.

How to spot fraud and scams

 

Scammers spend their days coming up with new ways to trick us. Learn what to watch out for to help keep yourself safe.

Reporting fraud

 

If you see an unauthorized charge or believe your account was compromised, let us know right away. Learn what to do and how to contact us.

How we help protect you

 

We're always working to make your banking safer. See how we're helping to protect you and your accounts.

Frequently asked questions

Before you sign in to chase.com, make sure your web address bar has one or more of the following:

  • a. A lock icon
  • b. The Chase logo
  • c. The exact phrase "https://www.chase.com"

If you see any of the above in the address bar, you'll know you're on the right website and not a fake (or "spoofed") look-alike.

Start by considering the tone of the message, as well as the request it's making. Scammers will act aggressively to get you to send them money, while most emails from us will simply be telling you about products and services we think you'll be interested in. We'll never ask you to send us personal or account information. If you're unsure, contact the financial institution to help assess your situation.

If it's a phone call, hang up. If it's an email or text message, stop responding. If you think you've given the scammer personal or account information, please contact the financial institution to help assess your situation.